Representative Howard Berman of Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley has been getting an earful lately from constituents disgruntled by constant, low level overflights from sightseeing, paparazzi and media helicopters from nearby Burbank Airport. In response, Berman introduced the Los Angeles Residential Helicopter Noise Relief Act which would require the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) to establish rules on flight paths and minimum altitudes for helicopter operations above residential neighborhoods within one year of the bill having been signed into law. The bill would contain exemptions for emergency responders and the military. Surprisingly, while FAA regulation 14 C.F.R. section 91.119 establishes minimum altitudes for fixed-wing aircraft, it exempts helicopters from such requirements. “A helicopter may be operated at less than the minimums prescribed in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, provided each person operating the helicopter complies with any routes or altitudes specifically prescribed for helicopters by the FAA.” 14 C.F.R. section 91.119(d)(1).


Continue Reading Proposed Legislation Would Grant Noise Relief from Helicopter Overflights

If enacted, proposed legislation would change the landscape for “through-the-fence” operations at public use airports that receive Federal funding. Through-the-fence [TTF] operations occur when an airport sponsor enters into an agreement that permits access to airport taxiways, runways and facilities by aircraft based on land adjacent to, but not part of, airport property. TTF operations range from off-airport fixed base operators [FBOs] who provide aeronautical support and services, and often compete with on-airport FBOs to provide the same support and services, to residential TTF agreements that grant airport access from hangars and homes located on private property adjacent to an airport [also known as “fly-in communities” or “residential airparks”]. Historically, the Federal Aviation Administration [FAA] has “discouraged” TTF operations at Federally funded airports, especially by FBOs that would compete with on-airport FBOs. The FAA has approved some residential TTF agreements on a case-by-case basis.


Continue Reading Proposed Federal Litigation Would Permit Residential Through-The-Fence Operations at Public Use Airports